updates
canonically bisexual

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+m. / fifteen/ intp/ philippines/ lady stan

i have a thing for underappreciated characters.

mainly: tv shows, the marvel cinematic universe, and intersectional feminism.

currently
watching: teen wolf s4/ sleepy hollow s1/ under the dome s2 (paused)/ utopia (paused)

reading: frankenstein/ probably 3 or 4 more books

networks:

+blacklist
+icon made by soldierboggs

mt

Tatiana tears up as a fan thanks Tatiana and the show for giving her the courage to come out and for writing Cosima as a character who is more than her sexuality. (x)

#tmas 

flirtydean:

The Avengers (2012), dir. Joss Whedon

"Takes us a while to get any traction, I’ll give you that one. But let’s do a head count here: your brother, the demigod; a super soldier, a living legend who kind of lives up to the legend; a man with breathtaking anger management issues; a couple of master assassins…and you, big fella, you’ve managed to piss off every single one of them."

posted 9 hours ago  with 105 notes  via xahvier  and flirtydean
#the avengers 

Sometimes things happen to people and they’re not equipped to deal with them. Like me, for instance. Right now.

#catching fire #graphics insp 
indigodreams:

Edward Coley Burne-Jones (1833-1898) by Sileni_ on Flickr.

indigodreams:

Edward Coley Burne-Jones (1833-1898) by Sileni_ on Flickr.

posted 9 hours ago  with 1,079 notes  via golden-trash  and Flickr / sileni
#art 

unflirty:

turn ons: nice hair, feminist ideology

posted 9 hours ago  with 58,475 notes  via captainscarletts  and unflirty
#me 

thetangledfield:

The Handy-Dandy Orphan Black Handbook
(inspired by lionsarah)

90s Slow Jamz: Tatiana Maslany said that she listens to 90s slow jams to get into character for Rachel. (see: Bump N’ Grind)

Ballpit of Denial: A place of comfort that the collective Clone Club dives into whenever something terrible happens to our beloved characters and we don’t want to accept the realities we’re faced with. Because nobody is safe in Orphan Black.

Big Dick Paul: Felix’s nickname for Paul (cleaned up for official social media as Hot Paul) (threefingersup)

Broclone: A Clone Club term of endearment/nickname/hashtag for Tony Sawicki.

Buddy: A term of endearment most often used by Evelyne Brochu in interviews/on twitter to describe her relationship with Tatiana Maslany/Cosima. Clone Club now uses buddy to refer to a more… intimate relationship. (see: Masbro)

Bump N’ Grind: An R. Kelly song that, during hiatus-induced delirium, was determined to be Rachel’s theme song.

Clonepocalypse: An event wherein Clone Clubbers change their tumblr urls to show support for OB and the cast (see: Tatianapocalypse). (ember1313)

Clone Club Book Club: We have great bodies… of literature. (clonefusion)

Clone Cub: Any new initiate to the Orphan Black fandom. Treasure your innocence, young one. (clonefusion)

Clone Disease: An autoimmune disease resulting from the cloning process. It presents first as a blood-tinged cough and progresses to widespread tumorigenesis. It is thought to originate in the uterus as the means to ensure all clones were barren. 

Cophine: A name for the relationship between Cosima Niehaus and Delphine Cormier.

Ebro/Evy: Clone Club nickname for Evelyne Brochu

Eskimo Pie: An ice cream treat of deception as well as Delphine’s contact name in Cosima’s email. (scshuttle)

Euroclones: The clones from Europe. (Anon)

Hella: A west coast form of “really” or “very,” a Cosima-ism that (fun fact) was never actually used by Cosima. It was transformed into one of the most-used words to describe anything in Clone Club. Sometimes it’s an adjective, sometimes it’s a noun, sometimes it’s the answer to the question itself. 

Hiatus: A term for the time between seasons of Orphan Black. It is a time of ridiculousness, desperation, occasional fits of crying, and fanfic to fill the void created by the absence of OB. 

Jell-o: Arguably Helena’s favorite food (aren’t all foods her favorite?) and a recurring reference in Clone Club to something that’s loved (e.g. …more than Helena loves Jell-o)

Kira (Lizard) Manning: A reference (s1e09) to Kira’s speedy recovery. Cosima says that Sarah may have passed down some of her genetic modifications, and mentions that “lizards re-grow limbs” to which Sara retorts “Cosima, Kira’s not a lizard.” And then Kira was photoshopped onto a lizard. 

Lumberfamily: The magical family unit formed by Cal, Sarah, and Kira.

Lumberjack: A reference to Cal Morrison, a handsome bearded dude who lives off-grid and wears flannel and thick comfortable sweaters. 

Lumberpunk: Name for the relationship between Cal Morrison (lumberjack) and Sarah (the punk).

Masbro: The real-life adorableness that is Tatiana Maslany and Evelyne Brochu

obspoilers: A simultaneously revered and hated tag. Any post that may contain spoilers for future episodes or the most recent episode (for the unfortunate few who cannot view the show when it airs) often have this tag for the purposes of post filtering. Sometimes they don’t. Sometimes things that aren’t spoilers have it. When do you stop using obspoilers? That’s hella complex. 

Punk Rock Ho: Sarah as Beth is called a “punk rock ho” by Paul when he comes home unexpectedly and sees Sarah as Beth dressed as Sarah (s1e02).

Puppy: A reference to Delphine Cormier. She makes sad puppy faces when Cosima yells at her and/or calls her out on her sneaky shit, but also looks like a cute puppy when she’s happy and excited. It has taken on a new level wherein people tag small adorable dogs (particularly Cocker Spaniels, the dog Evelyne Brochu said fit Delphine the best) with #Delphine. She also has a luxurious coat of hair. Delphine calls Cosima her “pauvre petit chiot” (poor little puppy) to which Cosima replies “you’re the puppy.” Second hiatus has transformed this into “pauvre petit chou” (poor little cabbage) to which Cosima replies “you’re the cabbage.” And they’re both cabbages (Cosima is a cabbage with glasses, obviously).

Rayray Slamdunc/Rachel Slamduncan: Affectionate nicknames for Rachel Duncan. Possibly originated out of the first clonepocalypse wherein Rachel’s head was shopped onto Michael Jordan’s body mid-slam dunk. 

Tatianapocalypse: A time during first hiatus when pretty much every member of the fandom on tumblr changed their urls to tatianamasany (followed by a number) to show support Tatiana at the 2014 Golden Globes. Everyone followed each other, a love-fest ensued, and it was beautiful. (saveoursestras)

Team Science Mega Force: The term used by Evelyne to describe Cophine’s teaming up to do crazy science in order to save Cosima’s life. It can now include Scott, because he’s awesome. (Anon)

Titty Malaysia: One of the most hilarious misrepresentations of Tatiana Maslany’s name, it then became a thing.

Tmas/Tat: Short for Tatiana Maslany.

Water Prayer Rasta Mix (Matt the Alien Mix): A song by Adham Shaikh, the Clone Club mating song. Used in the s2e10 finale as the clone dance party song. 

Read More

#ob 

hllucinate:

so is anyone secretly in love with me yet

posted 12 hours ago  with 785,369 notes  via veradux  and hllucinate
#q 
alisonisthegreateststar:

“Some of us remember book club, or as Aynsley called it, full-contact reading”
[Version 1.3! Updated: 20.06.2014]
As a fan of Orphan Black and a proud English lit major, I’ve found a lot of the same themes and ideas in the show that I’ve seen in some of my favourite pieces of literature. There have been some blatant allusions, while there are other parallels that may have been entirely unintentional but are still interesting to explore. With that in mind, I thought it would be super cool to put together a cloneclub reading list made up of some really important literature that might spur some further thought in you on Orphan Black. It also might be a good next step if you want to continue with the ideas developed in Orphan Black and take the genre further. Also, everyone’s always looking for some good ol book recommendations right?
Below I’ve alphabetically listed some of the books of essential cloneclub reading. I’ve also included each book’s connection to Orphan Black and any analyses that have been written by cloneclubbers concerning it in the last little while. Each title also links to more info on that book if you’re curious and want to read up even more on it!
If there’s anything you think is worth adding, just message me and let me know! There are infinite corners of the literary sphere I’ve yet to uncover for myself, so if you’ve read something cool and see some connections, send them my way! The same goes for any analyses floating out there I may have missed. I’ll try to update this post regularly and keep a link to it off of my blog so y’all can access it. 
Cheers cloneclub, and happy reading! 
~
1984: (George Orwell): Surveillance, societal oppression, deception, loss of identity; I could go on, but these are the makings and foundations of any good speculative fiction. Big Brother is watching, or shall we say, monitoring you. And did I mention that the clones just so happen to be born in 1984? This one’s important guys. (x) (x)
Angels and Demons: (Dan Brown) The interplay of science and religion is the main focus of this novel, so if the contrast between neolution and the proletheans is your thing, this would be right up your alley. A literal literary puzzle that makes for light, fun, summer reading.
Anthem: (Ayn Rand) Another classic dystopian novella that should be on anyone’s must-read list. Ideas of loss of identity, clones, dystopia, control of knowledge and advancement….all that good stuff.
The Bible: I’m not saying that you need to go out and read the whole bible, but there is a ton of really interesting origins to tropes and names in there that bears reading into. The whole idea of Rachel Leah and Jacob and the handmaids and fertility and bearing children….it’s extra yummy. Throw in all of that fish symbolism and then basically anything related to the proletheans and you have a wealth of knowledge right there.
Brave New World: (Aldous Huxley) Huxley station? Aldous Leekie? Eugenics? “It’s nice to make a friend in the brave new world”? Yeah, there are so many connections. Like, so many I can barely list them all. Read the book, and then go read about the connections and have your mind blown. (x)
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?: (Philip K. Dick) The parallels between Orphan Black and the classic sci-fi film Blade Runner are ever-apparent. (Eye-gouging and a child of the corporation named Rachael included!) Not everyone may know that the film is actually based off of this book from 1968. It deals with the consequences of creating life, morality, human existence, and what it means to be human or just someone’s creation. Also, fun fact — the overarching corporation is called Rosen. Daniel Rosen anyone? Jump on this classic in preparation for the inevitable kickass analysis over hiatus. 
Fight Club: (Chuck Palahniuk) First rule of cloneclub? Don’t tell anyone about cloneclub. That’s just a passing reference, but the thematic connections run deep. Identity issues, impersonation, personality disorder, narcotic addiction…all of that runs wild in this novel. Check out the book and not just the movie for an extra level of deep shit.
Frankenstein: (Mary Shelley) We see much of Victor’s innovation and ideals reflected in Neolution, as well as the monster’s search for identity reflected in the clones. Leekie says “to engineer, divine” briefly when rehearsing his speech in 2x01, and that’s the exact view Victor takes, resulting in nothing good. By the end of season 2 I’m sure even more parallels will become apparent.
Her Fearful Symmetry: (Audrey Niffenegger) MIRROR TWINS. Jacq, who is credited as the queen of the mirror twin theory has said this is the only other book she’s found with mirror twins in it. That alone should spark our interest. (Mirror twin discussion (x))
Leda: (Aldous Huxley) Yes, Huxley wrote a collection of poetry titled after the Greek myth our entire overarching origin story seems to have ties to. If you combine Huxley and poetry and Greek mythology, you’re bound to get something great, and this is just the greatest. (x)
Never Let Me Go: (Kazuo Ishiguro) Clones who have their entire lives dictated by an overarching power. Need I say more? The parallels here basically write themselves.
Oryx and Crake: (Margaret Atwood) Explores genetic engineering, divine creation, the morality of science, self-directed evolution; basically everything we’ve come to know and love about neolution. Also there may or may not be clones.
Song of Myself: (Walt Whitman) We were all pleasantly surprised to see a fraction of a second of binary flash at the end of one of the first OB teasers we got back at the end of February. When that was translated, it was revealed to be a line from this poem. Further, the next seven teasers released all that week contained more lines from various sections, prompting a massive cloneclub uproar and sudden enthusiasm for poetry. (x)
The Children of Men: (P. D. James) fertility, identity issues, power struggles, societal control….Yet another staple of any good dystopian reading list.
The Handmaid’s Tale:  (Margaret Atwood) Tons of symbolism of fertility, women’s rights to their bodies, control of creation of life, religious manipulation, indoctrination, identity issues, feminism, and oh, did I mention that the protagonist’s daughter was taken from her? (x) (x)
The Island of Dr. Moreau: (H. G. Wells) Um hello, this is the most canon book club book to ever exist. Ethan Duncan got little Kira reading it, now let’s get the whole cloneclub on this fantastic novel about a scientist on an island who attempts to create human-like creatures out of animals. Morality, ethics, science, and man’s attempts to control creation — this is book club at it’s finest. 
Various Works: (Arthur Rimbaud) Felix has the giant word “RIMBAUD” hung up in his loft, and we see our favourite morgie Colin reading some Rimbaud in season 1. Beyond canon shoutouts, Rimbaud’s poetry in general sets a foundation for later surrealist and symbolist movements — movements from which Orphan Black obviously draws some influence. 

alisonisthegreateststar:

“Some of us remember book club, or as Aynsley called it, full-contact reading”

[Version 1.3! Updated: 20.06.2014]

As a fan of Orphan Black and a proud English lit major, I’ve found a lot of the same themes and ideas in the show that I’ve seen in some of my favourite pieces of literature. There have been some blatant allusions, while there are other parallels that may have been entirely unintentional but are still interesting to explore. With that in mind, I thought it would be super cool to put together a cloneclub reading list made up of some really important literature that might spur some further thought in you on Orphan Black. It also might be a good next step if you want to continue with the ideas developed in Orphan Black and take the genre further. Also, everyone’s always looking for some good ol book recommendations right?

Below I’ve alphabetically listed some of the books of essential cloneclub reading. I’ve also included each book’s connection to Orphan Black and any analyses that have been written by cloneclubbers concerning it in the last little while. Each title also links to more info on that book if you’re curious and want to read up even more on it!

If there’s anything you think is worth adding, just message me and let me know! There are infinite corners of the literary sphere I’ve yet to uncover for myself, so if you’ve read something cool and see some connections, send them my way! The same goes for any analyses floating out there I may have missed. I’ll try to update this post regularly and keep a link to it off of my blog so y’all can access it. 

Cheers cloneclub, and happy reading! 

~

1984: (George Orwell): Surveillance, societal oppression, deception, loss of identity; I could go on, but these are the makings and foundations of any good speculative fiction. Big Brother is watching, or shall we say, monitoring you. And did I mention that the clones just so happen to be born in 1984? This one’s important guys. (x) (x)

Angels and Demons: (Dan Brown) The interplay of science and religion is the main focus of this novel, so if the contrast between neolution and the proletheans is your thing, this would be right up your alley. A literal literary puzzle that makes for light, fun, summer reading.

Anthem: (Ayn Rand) Another classic dystopian novella that should be on anyone’s must-read list. Ideas of loss of identity, clones, dystopia, control of knowledge and advancement….all that good stuff.

The Bible: I’m not saying that you need to go out and read the whole bible, but there is a ton of really interesting origins to tropes and names in there that bears reading into. The whole idea of Rachel Leah and Jacob and the handmaids and fertility and bearing children….it’s extra yummy. Throw in all of that fish symbolism and then basically anything related to the proletheans and you have a wealth of knowledge right there.

Brave New World: (Aldous Huxley) Huxley station? Aldous Leekie? Eugenics? “It’s nice to make a friend in the brave new world”? Yeah, there are so many connections. Like, so many I can barely list them all. Read the book, and then go read about the connections and have your mind blown. (x)

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?: (Philip K. Dick) The parallels between Orphan Black and the classic sci-fi film Blade Runner are ever-apparent. (Eye-gouging and a child of the corporation named Rachael included!) Not everyone may know that the film is actually based off of this book from 1968. It deals with the consequences of creating life, morality, human existence, and what it means to be human or just someone’s creation. Also, fun fact — the overarching corporation is called Rosen. Daniel Rosen anyone? Jump on this classic in preparation for the inevitable kickass analysis over hiatus. 

Fight Club: (Chuck Palahniuk) First rule of cloneclub? Don’t tell anyone about cloneclub. That’s just a passing reference, but the thematic connections run deep. Identity issues, impersonation, personality disorder, narcotic addiction…all of that runs wild in this novel. Check out the book and not just the movie for an extra level of deep shit.

Frankenstein: (Mary Shelley) We see much of Victor’s innovation and ideals reflected in Neolution, as well as the monster’s search for identity reflected in the clones. Leekie says “to engineer, divine” briefly when rehearsing his speech in 2x01, and that’s the exact view Victor takes, resulting in nothing good. By the end of season 2 I’m sure even more parallels will become apparent.

Her Fearful Symmetry: (Audrey Niffenegger) MIRROR TWINS. Jacq, who is credited as the queen of the mirror twin theory has said this is the only other book she’s found with mirror twins in it. That alone should spark our interest. (Mirror twin discussion (x))

Leda: (Aldous Huxley) Yes, Huxley wrote a collection of poetry titled after the Greek myth our entire overarching origin story seems to have ties to. If you combine Huxley and poetry and Greek mythology, you’re bound to get something great, and this is just the greatest. (x)

Never Let Me Go: (Kazuo Ishiguro) Clones who have their entire lives dictated by an overarching power. Need I say more? The parallels here basically write themselves.

Oryx and Crake: (Margaret Atwood) Explores genetic engineering, divine creation, the morality of science, self-directed evolution; basically everything we’ve come to know and love about neolution. Also there may or may not be clones.

Song of Myself: (Walt Whitman) We were all pleasantly surprised to see a fraction of a second of binary flash at the end of one of the first OB teasers we got back at the end of February. When that was translated, it was revealed to be a line from this poem. Further, the next seven teasers released all that week contained more lines from various sections, prompting a massive cloneclub uproar and sudden enthusiasm for poetry. (x)

The Children of Men: (P. D. James) fertility, identity issues, power struggles, societal control….Yet another staple of any good dystopian reading list.

The Handmaid’s Tale:  (Margaret Atwood) Tons of symbolism of fertility, women’s rights to their bodies, control of creation of life, religious manipulation, indoctrination, identity issues, feminism, and oh, did I mention that the protagonist’s daughter was taken from her? (x) (x)

The Island of Dr. Moreau: (H. G. Wells) Um hello, this is the most canon book club book to ever exist. Ethan Duncan got little Kira reading it, now let’s get the whole cloneclub on this fantastic novel about a scientist on an island who attempts to create human-like creatures out of animals. Morality, ethics, science, and man’s attempts to control creation — this is book club at it’s finest. 

Various Works: (Arthur Rimbaud) Felix has the giant word “RIMBAUD” hung up in his loft, and we see our favourite morgie Colin reading some Rimbaud in season 1. Beyond canon shoutouts, Rimbaud’s poetry in general sets a foundation for later surrealist and symbolist movements — movements from which Orphan Black obviously draws some influence. 

#literature #to read 

Just a few reasons why Cosima Niehaus is immeasurably important:

clonecosmos:

1. Science

You don’t get to see many women in science in our non-fictional world, and it’s almost as if these women (think Nyota Uhura, Dana Scully, etcetera, etcetera, just to name a few) in television and other forms of media are giving us this glimpse into what could be if only the world and the scientific academia would open their arms to women in the way some of these shows have. Cosima shows that women can be brilliant, and that they can hold their own. 

Not only that, she shows so much more control in the face of something so remarkably personal to her than someone like, say, Leekie. She researches for the science, sticking by her morals and ethics in the treatment she grants herself, and what she is willing to do/not do (case in point: Kira). She is the science, but she also feels that there is beauty in her situation and this opportunity to realise a whole new world in biology. There is this childlike passion in her, this insatiable curiosity about something that could very well kill her, but she is sure going to make the most of what she has an opportunity to study so closely while she is still around and able to do it.

2. Love

Firstly, Cosima loves her siblings. Unconditionally, really, even though she had started out portrayed as being there almost solely for the science. She cares deeply for her siblings, knowing the insecurities that Sarah has and understanding her flighty tendencies, complimenting and hugging the one who had tried to kill them all off before that. There was no reason for her to get up when Helena came in. No obligation, but she felt that she cared for these siblings of hers enough to expend her precious last shreds of energy to embrace them.

Cosima loves Kira. She shows Kira something that her mother never could; she gives Kira new insight into her world and, to some extent, into the world of Sarah and the other clones in a way that is safe and that protects the little girl’s innocence. There is a way in which Cosima understands this little girl and how special she is that no one else in this family can comprehend, and she tries her absolute best to ensure that Kira acts and feels like a child, and feels safe, however she can. She tries to do so through the thing that she holds dear to her and that has always comforted her: science. Only Cosima can provide Kira with this innocent window into the world of the clones, with the science that enabled this entire mess but perhaps holds a key to resolving all of it without exploiting this beautiful miracle child. This anomaly. 

Cosima loves Delphine. This is not only representation of one very, very, important thing: being in a homosexual relationship does not make you homosexual. Delphine (as far as we know) is bisexual, and Cosima “just loves people”. We need these things. Cosima shows us the meaning of love above all, yet knowing how to protect oneself from betrayal and deceit. It hurts her, and she loves Delphine deeply, yet she is willing to fight her and chase her out of her life should she feel betrayed and endangered by the actions of the other woman. She does not feel obligated to stay and suffer through the actions of the other woman, no matter how pure the intentions behind them had been, yet she knows to forgive, and to recognise a good thing when she sees one between them. 

3. Worldview

Optimism. Magic. Brilliance. Wonder. Endless forms most beautiful indeed. 

Cosima Niehaus has a lot to be bitter about. She is a clone; not exactly a person (where science is concerned), she is sick (in ways crippling, fatal and uncontrollable), she is betrayed and endangered and thrust into a world utterly foreign to her. Unlike most of the other clones she knows full well how cruel science experiments can be to the subjects. Yet she sees so much beauty in life, from each of her comments on things such as the golden spiral, to the carefree way she laughs. She is important, immeasurable so, in that she exhibits the best possible sort of worldview: eternal sunshine in a mind fully aware of all that goes on around her. She can still find joy and beauty amidst all the ugly. 

posted 14 hours ago  with 517 notes  via cloneclublibrary  and clonecosmos
#cosima niehaus 

Making of ORPHAN BLACK’s Special Effects in Season 2 

#ob 

itsgayerinenochian:

satans-ghost:

Do you ever get like super vulnerable late at night that you just want to spill your heart out and say how you feel because you’ve been holding it in for so long and you just need some ventilation and there’s just something about two in the morning that makes me lose my filter and say the things I would never have the guts to say when the sun is up.

the nights were mainly made for saying things that you can’t say tomorrow day

#q #me 

titytwochainz:

white people cry reverse racism about comic book characters being colored black but they finna make an entire movie about egyptians starring all white people. 

i’m petitioning for a george washington biopic starring samuel l jackson.

posted 15 hours ago  with 4,698 notes  via pplofcolor  and titytwochainz

lionsarah:

That’s not true. You saved my life. You’re my sister. Helena, I thought… I thought I killed you. I couldn’t tell anybody what I lost. But, you came back.

posted 15 hours ago  with 870 notes  via rachelduncann  and lionsarah
#ob #helena #sarah manning 

weinerchesters:

lets talk about how dreamworks made a main character with a prosthetic limb. lets talk about how his best friend and his dads best friend also had fully functional prosthetics that weren’t made to look inconspicuous. let’s talk about how the females are all kick ass, but have the capacity to be human. let’s talk about how the only sexualized thing in how to train your dragon 2 was eret son of eret’s arms